Trip Report – Santa Fe

The decision was made immediately after Kari-Lise and I got our first dose of the Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine back in May. TRAVEL. Travel was calling. Call it a spontaneous trip or revenge travel, we were hungry for the world. Like everyone else, we’d spent last year social distancing and sticking close to home, doing our part to stop the spread. Now, on our way to being fully inoculated and assured we wouldn’t unknowingly spread the virus to others, we craved a change of scenery—something opposite from the verdant mountains of Western Washington. We plotted our vaccine schedule, figured out the timeline, and booked a trip.

It’s been a decade since we visited Santa Fe, and it’s no surprise the city called to us once again. It’s an easy trip in non-pandemic times and was a place we both wanted to revisit. In May we weren’t sure how everything would play out, but we decided to roll the dice and plan for a trip of a few days exploring the town and the surrounding landscape. It was well worth it. Like any instance of travel, I came away feeling invigorated and creatively inspired. After a year at home, it was good to get away, breathe the thin desert air, and visit a place so unlike my daily experience. As the pandemic recedes in here America, everyone is still feeling out public behavior. But even with the mild awkwardness, the results were a trip comprised of fantastic food, incredible art, and surprising exploration.


The Food

It’s not going to be possible to share this trip without hitting on the copious amounts of delicious food we devoured. New Mexico is the land of the chile, and red and green varieties show up in every menu across the state, no matter what cuisine. When ordering, one is often asked if you want red or green chile—you can also opt for both by ordering your meal “Christmas.” (Yeah, it sounded corny the first time I said it as well. But the place is called Santa Fe. *rimshot*) Neither are particularly spicy despite the many warnings for tourists, but both are complex and flavorful. Trying different combos is worth the effort there’s no wrong choice here. Choose what works for you and enjoy.

Standout meals include the tacos from El Chile Toreado (arguably some of the best tacos I’ve ever had). The Short Rib Birria from Paloma, probably the fanciest dining we experienced on the trip. Solid enchiladas from The Shed (a return visit). And a strange little chile dog from the Taos Ale House; a mess to eat but incredibly delicious.


The Art

The third-largest art market in the United States is an artery running through the heart of Santa Fe along a street known as Canyon Road. (At this point it has spread well beyond Canyon Road, but posterity likes a metaphor.) The narrow lane is lined with over a hundred art galleries and studio spaces full of a variety of art. Everything from contemporary to traditional art, sculpture to jewelry, couture clothing to leather goods is offered somewhere along the route, and it’s easy to lose yourself for half a day or more.


These wind sculptures were quite relaxing.

Much had changed in the decade since our last visit, as one would suspect. Couple that with a receding pandemic and Canyon Road felt like a place awakening from a long slumber. In some spots, masks were optional for the fully vaccinated. Others were still being cautious and requiring masks and social distancing for all guests. We were happy to oblige and spent many hours wandering through the galleries discussing art and finding new favorites.

The standout for me was discovering the work of Grant Hayunga at his own recently opened gallery. His work varies but what stood out were his mixed media pieces that sat somewhere between paintings and relief sculpture. Made of various materials, calcium carbonate, crushed marble, beeswax, Hayunga creates fascinating pieces that explore humanity and our relationship with nature. My favorite from this series is fur trapper a recent piece from this year. He also creates these stunning neo-traditional landscapes, one of which—2016’s Asleep—enthralled both Kari-Lise and me. It’s all beautiful work, easily my favorite of the whole Canyon Road experience. You all need to buy more books from me so I can get one of his pieces.

“fur trapper” 2021, hanging in the Grant Hayunga Gallery

Meow Wolf

Canyon Road wasn’t the only artistic experience of the trip. When we last visited Santa Fe, the art collective known as Meow Wolf was still in its infancy. In the decade since our visit, they have experienced significant growth. Their permanent home in Santa Fe is a former-bowling alley funded by some local guy named George R. R. Martin. It sits near the southwestern edge of the city as is home to their first large-scale interactive art experience House of Eternal Return. It’s amazing. The whole thing plays out like an interactive X-Files episode.

I can write a thousand words on what is inside, but it’ll never do it justice. Even photos don’t really capture the magic. You begin outside a modest home oddly enclosed in a warehouse (the reason why is eventually explained). After you pass through the front door (it’s open), you’ll soon discover a rich story told through journals, newspaper articles, videos, and photo albums, pictures on the wall, toys in the bedroom, and much much more. It all ties the family that resided there and their experiences to the surreal worlds you’ll interact with as you move beyond the House itself. I don’t want to go into too much detail on the experience since the House gives back what you bring, and spoilers remove that sense of wonder. (I even consider not sharing pics.)

I came away feeling inspired by the whole thing and thought it’d be great to someday recreate a corner of Lovat for readers to explore in person. Will it ever happen? I don’t know. My “Old Haunts” project is a small attempt at capturing some of that, and while I love them, being able to do it in person would be so rich and satisfying. Imagine standing outside Russel & Sons with rain dropping down around you, muffled jazz blaring from somewhere above, and the smell of spicy noodles cooking from a push cart down the street. Rad idea, right?

House of Eternal Return isn’t Meow Wolf’s only project. They have another installation that went live this year, and more experiences are planned for the future (Denver and eventually Washington D.C.). We’re already looking at a trip to Las Vegas for one reason: visit Omega Mart. Think cosmic horror as a grocery store chain, and you’d be on track. (Check out some of their ads.) It all sounds as creepy and weird and wonderful as I’d hope. I am excited to explore its aisles in the future.


New Mexico Highlands

On a whim, we decided to leave Santa Fe behind and head out into the country. We did this a decade ago, heading northwest toward Abiquiú and the Ghost Ranch. This time we headed northeast toward Taos. Early-summer storms were sweeping across the land, and you could watch enormous dark clouds trailing tails of rain and shadow for miles. For some reason, I expected more of the high desert environment like what I saw ten years previous. But the land toward the northeast was very different to that of the west, it rose suddenly. As we left the desert behind, we found ourselves in the foothills of the Sangre de Cristo Range of the Southern Rocky Mountains. I’ve grown up among the Rocky’s most of my life. But driving north along highway 68 and looking across the vast Taos plateau and seeing the gorge carved by the Rio Grande was utterly breathtaking. I’ve seen deep valleys before, but never one carved in such flat and open land and from such a height. I still find myself reflecting on that view. Seeing the ground opened up that way was like staring into the vastness of time.

The Río Grande Gorge from the Taos Overlook, off State Road 68 near the “horseshoe.” Photo from the Taos News.

Instead of continuing East across the Rio Grande Gorge Bridge, we decided to loop up into the mountains. We found ourselves in Carson National Forest, taking the High Road to Taos scenic byway back to Santa Fe. This is proper mountain country, think tall trees, deep valleys, tiny communities tucked away into hollows, and vast untouched stretches of forest for miles and miles. It all felt closer to home. Beautiful, but not at all what I anticipated.

So Much More

Santa Fe and the surrounding land can be a bit surreal at times. Modern art and interactive art experiences exist alongside deep history. The Palace of the Governors, erected in 1610, is the oldest public building in continuous use in America. Just down the street is the San Miguel Mission, the oldest church in the United States. Outside of Taos is the Taos Pueblo, the oldest continuously inhabited community in the United States, originating sometime between 1000–1450 A.D. and not discovered by Europeans until the sixteenth century. And that only scratches the surface of what you can find in this small section of the state. This doesn’t even begin to cover other places in New Mexico we were unable to visit, locations like White Sands, Roswell, Carlsbad Caverns, Shiprock, Trinity, the burning of Zozobra, Los Alamos, and so much more. There is a density of wonder here and New Mexico doesn’t hold back and is very much worth your attention.


Advice & Tips

  • You’re going to want to rent a car, this is big country. That said when in town, be willing to walk. There’s so much to see in Santa Fe, and unexpected places are often found on foot.
  • Eat everything. Try new dishes. Explore New Mexican cuisine. Fear no chile. Don’t be put off by location. Sometimes the smallest trucks tucked into the quietest corners can have the best tacos.
  • Scenic byways are your friend in Western States and New Mexico is full of them (High Road to Taos, Turquoise Trail, Santa Fe Trail, among many many others). While slower than major freeways, these routes will give travelers glimpses into a New Mexico easily missed by tourists. The extra time is worth it.

This was my fourth trip into New Mexico, my second to Santa Fe, and easily my favorite of the bunch. Each time I visit, the trips get a little longer, and each time I return I wish I had stayed a few more days. The name “Land of Enchantment” is a fitting one. The terrain there is haunting, rich in history and legend, and it calls to the traveler to take time and explore its wonders.

I’m not going to lie, it’s weird to travel right now, even fully vaccinated. People are rightly nervous, business hours are funky, and what we thought of as “normal” has changed significantly. Traveling at the end of a pandemic requires a lot of patience and copious amounts of kindness and empathy. We’re in a transitional period, and those can be both interesting and weird to navigate. However, it’s still worth it to get away for a time, and allow oneself to experience the world again. It was good to return to New Mexico, and a shame to have waited so long to return. Here’s hoping our next visit comes sooner rather than later.

2020 in Ten Significant Photos

2020 in Ten Significant Photos

Today is December 19th, also known as March 294th, around our house. 2020, man. 2020. I think we can all agree it’s been a terrible year. If not personally, then nationally and globally. And we still have twelve days left. Feels like it’s been forever and yet, somehow, no time at all.

The tradition around here dictates I need to assemble a post wherein I share ten photos from the year representing the most significant moments of my personal past 365-ish days. Normally, I look forward to this, but 2020 was tougher than most. This time around, I wasn’t so eager to ponder how the year went. I didn’t want to dwell on the events that have unfolded. But I did. And below is the culmination of that effort, for better or worse.

The rules are simple but firm, pick ten photos from your past year that are the most significant to you: positive or negative—significance can be found in either. But it can’t be more, it can’t be less. Some moments will have to fall by the wayside—and that’s intentional—culling is essential. It’ll help create a more realistic picture of your year. Some years will be harder than others, and sometimes you’ll need to discover significance in the smaller, quieter moments. The ten are irascible, and they’re relentless. It is the way.

So, enough talk! Let’s take a look at my 2020 distilled into ten significant photos.


The Multnomah Whiskey Library in Portland

We began our 2020 by going on a trip to celebrate Kari-Lise’s birthday. Ah, those carefree halcyon days. Feels like a lifetime ago. This time we took an extensive food-focused trip to Portland and Hood River, Oregon. It was easily one of the best trips we’ve taken together and a wonderful way to celebrate Kari-Lise’s birthday. We ate and drank and tasted so many incredible things. I had planned to put together one of my standard travel posts a few months after we returned, but 2020 had other plans. It’s odd to looking back. It feels like a different era.


Amberlynn being cozy. (Photo by my brother, Nick Alexander.)

Not long after our return from Portland, my brother Nick and my sister-in-law Hallie welcomed their second child, Amberlynn, into the world in February. With Liesel and Blakely arriving last year and Amberlynn this year, I now have three nieces that have all shown up in a very short time. Can’t wait to watch them grow up and spoil them rotten. I’ve yet to meet Amberlynn. (Details why in the next photo. You can probably guess.) But, I’m looking forward to the day I do.


Pandemic hair. Pandemic mask. Pandemic isolation.

So, the obvious one—the COVID-19 pandemic. I could wax poetic about everything that’s happened in the last ten months, but we’ve all been dealing with this. What can I say that hasn’t been said already by a thousand other folks? I am tired of staying at home. I miss my family and friends. At the same time, I know it’s the right thing to do, and I’m blessed that I have a job that allows me to do it. Please do what you can to stay safe and healthy. Be kind. Wear a mask. Social distance. Avoid groups. Get your vaccine when you can. All that stuff.


Not where you want to find yourself at 3AM

2020 was the gift that keeps on giving. Early in the pandemic Tyrant, one of our two old dogs (he’s fifteen!) started having breathing issues one Saturday morning, and we had to take him to an emergency vet. That turned into early morning calls and early morning trips to the pharmacy. The same weekend our other old dog, Suge (she’s fourteen!), had a cyst that burst on her back leg, so she ended up in the doggie hospital for minor surgery. Two dogs. Two hospitals. Many vets. All in the middle of a pandemic. It was an exhaustive and stress-filled four days. Thankfully, both dogs are doing well. Suge is back to her rambunctious self. Tyrant is still sleepy and lazy and gets to take doggy pills three times a day.


Welcome to the CHAZ

Black Lives Matter. I don’t know why that’s a difficult concept for some people to grasp. This summer was similar to summers in other parts of the country. Protests. Marches. Police action. Bits of violence. For a brief moment, Seattle had the Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone and offshoot of the protests, which drew most of the country’s attention. The outgoing President might have declared Seattle an “Anarchist Jurisdiction” (whatever that means,) but the tales of chaos were greatly exaggerated and largely overblown. Ignore your weird uncle on Facebook. The CHAZ only lasted for a few weeks. Demonstrations there have largely faded away. But the BLM movement rightfully continues, and I don’t think it’ll stop until we see systematic change.


Kari-Lise in front of the titular Night Garden

Kari-Lise revealed Night Garden, her latest solo show at Roq La Rue, and it was wildly successful! It’s strange to have a gallery show in the middle of a pandemic. There was no official opening. No opening night crowds. No afterparty. But the show premiered online and ended up selling out. I feel like I broken record repeating the same thing I do every show, but I think this series was her best work ever. I’m incredibly proud to see how she continues to evolve as an artist. Can’t wait to see what she does next.


Pork chop sandwiches! (Technically pork butt, but references.)

So, I’ve always liked cooking, and this year was no different. If anything, this year I cooked even more, since I had more time at home. I feel like I dialed in my meat-smoking game and got a little better at baking (like everyone else, but I’m still not great.) This little BBQ sandwich was 100% made from scratch. Smoke pork butt. Steamed/Fried sourdough half-way buns. Homemade dill pickles. Homemade pickled onions. Stone ground mustard. Yes, it was delicious. Yes, I made it more than once.


Sunset on the Colvos Passage

In October, we briefly escaped one house to retreat to another. We rented an incredible cabin on Vashon Island, only a ferry ride away from Seattle. We spent a week on the island. We hiked, explored, cooked, relaxed, read a ton, soaked in a huge bathtub, took showers in an outdoor shower. I also took the time to revamp this website. And we were able to do it with proper social distancing! It was a chill and relaxing week away from the world and unplugged from a stressful news cycle. We loved it so much we are planning a return visit in January. So don’t be shocked if a similar photo appears in next year’s list.


I voted! You voted! A lot of us voted!

One of the wildest and most important elections in my lifetime happened, and what an election it was. Records were smashed. Norms were abandoned. Lawsuits were filed and quickly tossed out when no evidence could be presented except for wishes, hopes, and dreams. (Turns out wanting something to be true won’t make it true.) It was great to see so many Americans actively involved in the civic process. King County, Washington (where I live) had an 85% turnout, which I never thought I’d see in my lifetime. It made me really proud of my city, county, state, and country. Nice work, America. Let’s keep this trend of civic involvement going.


New floors and a fantastic built in room divider bookcase built by my pal Steve.

It’s hard to encapsulate this in a single image. Like much of the world, 2020 became the “Year of the House” for the Alexanders. This had been the plan for us before the pandemic set in, and we had been saving toward it for a while. We bought this place in 2010, which means we’ve been living in our house for a decade, and it was past time to put a little love back into the place. That means, among other things, new paint, new roof, new floors in several rooms, lots of love pour into the garden, new countertops, that fantastic bookcase in the picture above, and we’re in the middle of a bathroom remodel. It’s been awkward, stressful, and a bit odd at times juggling all this work with the pandemic, but we think it’ll be worth it.


In Conclusion

Looking back at everything that happened in 2020, I was surprised to find how much significance happened even while I spent most of my time here at home. The ten photos above don’t begin to cover everything that happened. My sister-in-law’s father, Tom, passed away, a dear man, and we could only send condolences from afar. Friends and family got sick, and not just from COVID. Pets passed away. People lost jobs. There were the forest fires and the awful weeks of smoke that blanketed much of the PNW. MURDER HORNETS.

But it wasn’t all awful events. New hobbies were found. New skills explored. Moth & Myth continued its wild growth and is leaping into a new phase of business. Friends published books. Friends made art. Friends had shows. Friends wrote new books and game systems. We all learned how to video conference (for better or worse.) There was good to be found even among the muck. I’m not going to miss 2020. It might have been an awful year, but it’s probably been one of the most notable years of my life.

So, how about you? What did you experience in 2020? What are your ten? Assemble them and leave a comment with a link! Let us all know about the significant events in your year.


Want to revisit my photos of past years? The experiences then seem almost charming now. Just click on any of the links below and check out my pictures from that specific year. I find it fascinating to watch subtle changes year over year.

2014 • 2015 • 2016 • 2017 • 20182019


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Giving Back Promo Results

Giving Back Promo Results

Because of the events of the last few days, I’m intentionally a little late with this report. As anyone who reads my blog regularly knows, for the previous few months, I’ve been running a special promotion. I reduced eBook copies of The Stars Were Right were down to a buck, and 100% of the profits were going to be donated to the World Central Kitchen. Well, June 1st has rolled around, and the promotion has ended. I am proud to say that with your help, we raised OVER $500 for the WCK. ($516.94 to be specific.)

I am stunned and beyond amazed. Pat yourself on the back! Thank you, thank you, thank you! That can buy a lot of food, and it’ll go a long way to help those currently struggling with food insecurity. Thank you to everyone who joined in the promo, helped spread the word, bought a book from me or just donated directly. You did a little good, and we made our world a better place, it’s no secret we’re facing some tough times, and your generosity is something of which you can be proud. This letter isn’t just for me, it’s for us:

WCK Donation Confirmation

(Yeah, I rounded up and offered to cover the card fees, so the WCK got more of our donation, that’s what the end amount is a bit higher.) If you didn’t get an opportunity to join in the promotion, you can still donate to the WCK. Just click the link below and give what you can. A little bit can go a long way.

DONATE TODAY

Follow the WCK on social media, they’re very active on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook, and you can get a glimpse at the noble work they’re doing. Want to volunteer? Details on how you can help are available here.

Photo via World Central Kitchen/WCK.org


FEATURED IMAGE CREDIT: World Central Kitchen/WCK.org


Dead Drop: Missives from the desk of K. M. AlexanderWant to stay in touch with me? Sign up for Dead Drop, my rare and elusive newsletter. Subscribers get news, previews, and notices on my books before anyone else delivered directly to their inbox. I work hard to make sure it’s not spammy and full of interesting and relevant information.  SIGN UP TODAY →

Buy The Stars Were Right Now for 99¢ and Give Back

The Stars Were Right 99¢ Give Back Promotion Ends Today!

It feels weird promoting this in light of everything that’s happened over the last few days, but here we are. Pretty much what the title says—today is the last day you can buy my weird little Lovecraftian urban fantasy novel, The Stars Were Right, for only 99¢—all the profits will be donated to the World Central Kitchen in their fight against food insecurity here in America and abroad. I’ll reveal the results tomorrow! (They’re quite exciting.)

Links to purchase the ebook are below. Already have a copy? Consider buying one for your friends or a family member who might want a little escapism right now.


Kindle • Kobo • Nook • Apple Books• Google Play • Gumroad


I am also aware that many are facing severe economic instability. One in four Americans is out of work. For them, perhaps you, money is tight. If your interested in reading my book but can’t swing the 99¢, you can also download the book for free. (I’m serious.) Use the Gumroad link above and set the price at zero and bam, it’s yours. On me. Like the promotion, this will also end tonight. So don’t delay!


What if I want to help, but really don’t want an eBook?

No pressure! If you want to help but aren’t interested in my book, you can donate directly to the WCK by clicking the link below. They have options for a single donation, or you can become a monthly donor. It’s a phenomenal charity which I detailed in this post.

DONATE TODAY

Want to help in other ways? Follow the WCK on social media, they’re very active on InstagramTwitter, and Facebook, and you can get a glimpse at the noble work they’re doing. Want to volunteer? Details on how you can help are available here.

Photo via World Central Kitchen/WCK.org

EXTENDED—Helping the WCK Fight Hunger

I’ve seen a host of kind-hearted readers helping me raise money for the World Central Kitchen during the current COVID-19 crisis. Now more than ever it’s important to come together and help those facing food insecurity. To continue this fight, I’m going to extend my offer donating 100% of the profits of eBook copies of The Stars Were Right through June 1st. So there’s still time to help. Details about the WCK, the good work they’re doing, why I selected them, and how you can help are below.


I like food. I’m a food nerd. A “foodie.” I like to cook. I like to eat. I’ll try anything at least once. This isn’t a secret. So, it’ll come as no surprise that when I see a charity founded by a famous chef with the goal of helping the hungry during a time of crisis, it immediately piques my interest. It’s the sort of charity I’m glad to support.

Ten years ago, Chef José Andrés and his wife Patricia Fernández de la Cruz started the World Central Kitchen to prepare food for those in need following a devastating earthquake in Haiti. Since then, the organization has expanded and has continued working to solve the issues of hunger that always arrives alongside disaster. They’ve been everywhere and have helped in all sorts of emergencies, from hurricanes, earthquakes, floods, tornados, wildfires, to the U.S. government shutdown, or the refugee crisis along the Colombia/Venezuelan and U.S./Mexico borders. Where there are hungry people, World Central Kitchen is there to feed them.

Photo via World Central Kitchen/WCK.org

Since the rise of COVID-19 and its rampage across the globe, World Central Kitchen has stepped up yet again, organizing food relief for communities struggling in the crisis as well as helping to feed the first-responders working to save the sick. With their #ChefsForAmerica program, they’re also recruiting local restaurants putting them back to work and bringing them into their fight against hunger. They’re currently serving over 160,000 meals per day.

I can’t think of a more noble cause right now, and I want to help the WCK as they work to help others. You can join me in donating to the World Central Kitchen by clicking the link below.

DONATE TODAY

Follow the WCK on social media, they’re very active on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook and you can get a glimpse at the noble work they’re doing. Want to volunteer? Details on how you can help are available here.


Need more incentive?

A few weeks ago, I lowered the eBook price of my first novel, The Stars Were Right down to 99¢—it’s as low as retailers will let me go. Since then, 100% of the profits from any purchase of The Stars Were Right from any channel will be donated to the World Central Kitchen. No matter where you make your purchase, you get a bit of escapism, and together we’ll help feed those in need during this time of crisis. Not a bad deal, right?

You can buy the eBook from any of the retailers listed below. Want to help me give more to the World Central Kitchen? Use Gumroad and name your price—100% of the earnings will be donated at the end of the promotion.

KindleKobo Nook Apple Books Google Play Gumroad

Speaking of name your own price…


Don’t have 99¢? Get the book anyway. (Seriously.)

I realize as I put this book on sale, an astronomical number of people around the world have lost their jobs over the last few weeks. To those folks, even 99¢ can seem like a lot to swing for a piece of entertainment. So, if you can’t afford to buy the book right now, you can download it for free. Use the Gumroad link above and set the price at zero and bam, it’s yours.


As I said a few weeks ago, we’re all in this together. Stay home. Stay healthy. Stay safe. Let’s flatten the curve. We’ll get through this.

Photo via World Central Kitchen/WCK.org


Dead Drop: Missives from the desk of K. M. AlexanderWant to stay in touch with me? Sign up for Dead Drop, my rare and elusive newsletter. Subscribers get news, previews, and notices on my books before anyone else delivered directly to their inbox. I work hard to make sure it’s not spammy and full of interesting and relevant information.  SIGN UP TODAY →

Let's Help the World Central Kitchen Fight Hunger

Helping the World Central Kitchen Fight Hunger

I like food. I’m a food nerd. A “foodie.” I like to cook. I like to eat. I’ll try anything at least once. This isn’t a secret. So, it’ll come as no surprise that when I see a charity founded by a famous chef with the goal of helping the hungry during a time of crisis, it immediately piques my interest. It’s the sort of charity I’m glad to support.

Ten years ago, Chef José Andrés and his wife Patricia Fernández de la Cruz started the World Central Kitchen to prepare food for those in need following a devastating earthquake in Haiti. Since then, the organization has expanded and has continued working to solve the issues of hunger that always arrives alongside disaster. They’ve been everywhere and have helped in all sorts of emergencies, from hurricanes, earthquakes, floods, tornados, wildfires, to the U.S. government shutdown, or the refugee crisis along the Colombia/Venezuelan and U.S./Mexico borders. Where there are hungry people, World Central Kitchen is there to feed them.

Photo via World Central Kitchen/WCK.org

Since the rise of COVID-19 and its rampage across the globe, World Central Kitchen has stepped up yet again, organizing food relief for communities struggling in the crisis as well as helping to feed the first-responders working to save the sick. With their #ChefsForAmerica program, they’re also recruiting local restaurants putting them back to work and bringing them into their fight against hunger. They’re currently serving over 160,000 meals per day.

I can’t think of a more noble cause right now, and I want to help the WCK as they work to help others. You can join me in donating to the World Central Kitchen by clicking the link below.

DONATE TODAY

Follow the WCK on social media, they’re very active on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook and you can get a glimpse at the noble work they’re doing. Want to volunteer? Details on how you can help are available here.


Need more incentive?

A few weeks ago, I lowered the eBook price of my first novel, The Stars Were Right down to 99¢—it’s as low as retailers will let me go. Since then, 100% of the profits from any purchase of The Stars Were Right from any channel will be donated to the World Central Kitchen. No matter where you make your purchase, you get a bit of escapism, and together we’ll help feed those in need during this time of crisis. Not a bad deal, right?

You can buy the eBook from any of the retailers listed below. Want to help me give more to the World Central Kitchen? Use Gumroad and name your price—100% of the earnings will be donated at the end of the promotion.

KindleKobo Nook Apple Books Google Play Gumroad

Speaking of name your own price…


Don’t have 99¢? Get the book anyway. (Seriously.)

I realize as I put this book on sale, an astronomical number of people around the world have lost their jobs over the last few weeks. To those folks, even 99¢ can seem like a lot to swing for a piece of entertainment. So, if you can’t afford to buy the book right now, you can download it for free. Use the Gumroad link above and set the price at zero and bam, it’s yours.


As I said a few weeks ago, we’re all in this together. Stay home. Stay healthy. Stay safe. Let’s flatten the curve. We’ll get through this.

Photo via World Central Kitchen/WCK.org


Dead Drop: Missives from the desk of K. M. AlexanderWant to stay in touch with me? Sign up for Dead Drop, my rare and elusive newsletter. Subscribers get news, previews, and notices on my books before anyone else delivered directly to their inbox. I work hard to make sure it’s not spammy and full of interesting and relevant information.  SIGN UP TODAY →