Five Genre-Busting Fiction Writers You Should Read

Five Genre-Busting Fiction Writers You Should Read

When it comes to reading, I always appreciate the weird. I’m drawn to tales that are on the fringe, stories that are difficult to place within traditional genres. Weird fiction—as a result, calls to me. There’s something about those category-defying stories that make me feel at home. Perhaps you also enjoy stories like this? (If you read and enjoyed my books, I’d wager you did.)

It’s been a while—Halloween, actually—since I’ve given book recommendations. So, let’s rectify that today. Below I’ve shared five authors who write fiction that’s a little hard to pin down. As of this year, whenever I share books, all links will now go to IndieBound instead of Amazon—be sure to support your local bookstore. Also, where possible, I am now linking to each author’s official website. So be sure to give those a visit as well.


"Trail of Lightning" by Rebecca Roanhorse

Rebecca Roanhorse

Recommended Book: Trail of Lightning (The Sixth World #1)

What begins as a gritty desert-focused modern fantasy following a Navajo monster hunter quickly expands into something more—Roanhorse takes the contemporary threat of environmental catastrophe creates a refreshing post-apocalyptic setting in which she places her southwest desert setting. What you end up with is a world that reworks your standard monster-hunting tropes and takes them into fresh and wonderfully strange territory. A fantastic read.

Also by Roanhorse: Storm of Locusts (The Sixth World #2), Welcome to Your Authentic Indian Experience (Short Story)


Fonda Lee

Recommended Book: Jade City (The Green Bone Saga #1)

Transcending your standard genres and weaving an intricate wuxia tale of criminal clans in a pseudo-1980s city, Lee goes in places no other fantasy has before. A story of family, crime, and honor, complete with magic enhanced abilities and kung-fu style action. Here you’ll find complex characters, a visceral world, and a high body count. A perfect blend of genres to create a unique and utterly refreshing experience.

Also by Lee: Jade War (The Green Bone Saga #2), Exo


"All the Birds in the Sky" by Charlie Jane Anders

Charlie Jane Anders

Recommended Book: All the Birds in the Sky

A strange and often surreal tale that weaves together a helping of science fiction, a dash of awkward romance, a smattering of academy fantasy, and a hefty serving of the downright bizarre. It’s hard to truly pin down this tale of love during that awkward twenty-something malaise—it’s been called magic realism, it’s been called fantasy, and it’s something right in the middle. Polarizing it might be, but it’s solidly unique.

Also by Anders: The City in the Middle of the Night


"Winter Tide" by Ruthanna Emrys

Ruthanna Emrys

Recommended Book: Winter Tide (The Innsmouth Legacy #1)

Often it’s easy for series rooted in Lovecraft to slip entirely into the horror genre. However, Emrys takes a different approach. Here she creates a forlorn experience that reexamines the atrocities and ramifications of American internment camps and the Cold War through a slightly stranger lens. History and horror are woven together here in a fascinating (if not polarizing) tale of human nature.

Also by Emrys: Deep Roots (The Innsmouth Legacy #2), Imperfect Commentaries


"Chapelwood" by Cherie Priest

Cherie Priest

Recommended Book: Chapelwood (The Borden Dispatches #2)

Taking the historical account of Lizzie Borden and coupling it with Lovecraftian Horror, Priest manages to create an engaging and wonderfully weird series in The Borden Dispatches. While her first book is delightful, her second is divine. The characters are more established, the plot tighter, the world richer, and the events within more distressing with every page turn.

Also by Priest: The Toll, Brimstone


If you’ve spent any time here, you’ve undoubtedly you’ve heard me sing the praises of one of these authors before. But, perhaps they’re new to you, and hopefully, you find something here to enthrall you, and you’ll discover a new genre-defying world to explore. Have a suggestion of your own? Is there a favorite genre-busting author who’s work you enjoyed? Leave a comment below and let me know!


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The Woolf

I’m in The Woolf

My friend, fellow author, and travel buddy, Jim Rushing, recently put together a great (and extensive) interview on writing cross-genre fiction for the online literary mag, The Woolf. You can read it via the link below:

“What if your book is the child of two genres?”

In it, a group of us discuss a lot of great topics from how cross-genre work is born to how it’s approached in publishing, to our influences. As most of my readers know, genre-blending is something near and dear to my heart, and it was an honor to be interviewed along with a cadre of excellent writers: Virginia KingAnthony LodgeK.T. LeeSuzy HowlettRae StoltenkampRohan Quine, and Rob Johnson. You should check out their work as well and see if there is anything that strikes your fancy. The Woolf is primarily focused on writers based out of Zurich, but it regularly features a lot of excellent content. It’s worth exploring.


📚 Further Reading

This isn’t the first time I’ve written or talked about cross-genre writing. It comes up a lot. I’ve spoken about it at length on the HorrorBrew podcast, and I wrote an essay for Fantasy Book Critic about blending genres.


Big thanks to Jim Rushing for giving me this opportunity. It was fun, and I always love learning how other cross-genre writers work. You can find out more about Jim, his writing, his travels, and delicious drink recipes, by visiting his site: https://jrushingwrites.com.